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BREAKING: New Half Marathon World Record

One year after his compatriot Joyciline Jepkosgei broke the women’s world record at the Valencia Half Marathon, Kenya’s Abraham Kiptum broke the men’s world record at the IAAF Gold Label road race, clocking 58:18 to take five seconds off the mark set by Eritrea’s Zersenay Tadese in 2010.

At yesterday’s technical meeting it was confirmed that the men’s pacemakers would reach the 10km point in 27:50 to target a finishing time just inside 59 minutes, but there wasn’t any talk of a possible world record assault.

On a perfect day for endurance events (a slight wind and 11C), the race opened according to the plan with the main pack passing the opening five kilometres in 13:56. By 10 kilometres, the pace had dropped slightly as the 15-man lead pack went through that checkpoint in 28:02.

But shortly afterwards the long-legged Kiptum broke away from the rest of the pack with incredible ease and began to cover each kilometre in a stunning 2:44.

The 15-kilometre split of 41:40 – just seven seconds slower than Tadese’s equivalent split from his world record run – suggested that Kiptumwas on course to break his PB of 59:09 set six weeks ago in Copenhagen.

Ethiopia’s Jemal Yimer was still just two seconds behind Kiptum, and his compatriot Abadi Hadi, the world cross-country bronze medallist, was in third, another second in arrears.

Boosted by the crowd and fully aware that he was close to world record schedule, Kiptum kept on pushing hard to open a sizeable margin over the Ethiopian pair.

The Kenyan reached 20 kilometres in 55:18 to take three seconds off Tadese’s previous world best of 55:21 set on his way to his world half marathon best of 58:23 in Lisbon eight years ago.

Having covered the second 10-kilometre section in 27:16, Kiptum strode home in 58:18 to bring the world record back to his country’s possession, Samuel Wanjiru being his predecessor in 2007 (58:35). Valencia, meanwhile, is now the venue of both men’s and women’s world records.

Runner-up Yimer also destroyed his previous career best of 59:00 as he was timed at 58:31 to move to third on the world all-time list while 21-year-old Hadis clocked 58:43, lowering his best by almost two minutes.

In the fierce battle to be first European home, Britain’s Callum Hawkins finished in 1:01:00 for 16th with Spain’s Toni Abadía making a respectable debut over the distance in 1:01:15.

Source IAAF

BREAKING: New Half Marathon World Record

One year after his compatriot Joyciline Jepkosgei broke the women’s world record at the Valencia Half Marathon, Kenya’s Abraham Kiptum broke the men’s world record at the IAAF Gold Label road race, clocking 58:18 to take five seconds off the mark set by Eritrea’s Zersenay Tadese in 2010.

At yesterday’s technical meeting it was confirmed that the men’s pacemakers would reach the 10km point in 27:50 to target a finishing time just inside 59 minutes, but there wasn’t any talk of a possible world record assault.

On a perfect day for endurance events (a slight wind and 11C), the race opened according to the plan with the main pack passing the opening five kilometres in 13:56. By 10 kilometres, the pace had dropped slightly as the 15-man lead pack went through that checkpoint in 28:02.

But shortly afterwards the long-legged Kiptum broke away from the rest of the pack with incredible ease and began to cover each kilometre in a stunning 2:44.

The 15-kilometre split of 41:40 – just seven seconds slower than Tadese’s equivalent split from his world record run – suggested that Kiptumwas on course to break his PB of 59:09 set six weeks ago in Copenhagen.

Ethiopia’s Jemal Yimer was still just two seconds behind Kiptum, and his compatriot Abadi Hadi, the world cross-country bronze medallist, was in third, another second in arrears.

Boosted by the crowd and fully aware that he was close to world record schedule, Kiptum kept on pushing hard to open a sizeable margin over the Ethiopian pair.

The Kenyan reached 20 kilometres in 55:18 to take three seconds off Tadese’s previous world best of 55:21 set on his way to his world half marathon best of 58:23 in Lisbon eight years ago.

Having covered the second 10-kilometre section in 27:16, Kiptum strode home in 58:18 to bring the world record back to his country’s possession, Samuel Wanjiru being his predecessor in 2007 (58:35). Valencia, meanwhile, is now the venue of both men’s and women’s world records.

Runner-up Yimer also destroyed his previous career best of 59:00 as he was timed at 58:31 to move to third on the world all-time list while 21-year-old Hadis clocked 58:43, lowering his best by almost two minutes.

In the fierce battle to be first European home, Britain’s Callum Hawkins finished in 1:01:00 for 16th with Spain’s Toni Abadía making a respectable debut over the distance in 1:01:15.

Lorna Kiplagat’s threepeat revisited at Falmouth Road Race

Canadian Ben Flanagan pulled away from the pack in the last mile to win the Falmouth Road race on Sunday, becoming the first man from North America to win the race in 30 years. Last year’s winner Stephen Sambu finished fourth.

Caroline Chepkoech of Kenya took the women’s race, her third straight win at Falmouth. The 24 year old took charge in the third mile and surged to a five-second win over fellow Kenyan Margaret Wangari. Mary Wacera, also from Kenya, was third in 37:17. Chepkoech is the first female runner to threepeat since Lornah Kiplagat in 2002.

Here are the top ten finishers in each category.

MEN

1. Ben Flanagan, 32:21

2. Scott Fauble, 32:23

3. Leonard Korir, 32:28

4. Stephen Sambu, 32:32

5. Martin Hehir, 32:38

6. Haron Lagat, 32:43

7. Colin Bennie, 32:49

8. Tim Ritchie, 32:50

9. Andrew Colley, 32:53

10. Ross Millington, 32:56

WOMEN

1. Caroline Chepkoech, 35:48

2. Margaret Wangari, 36:43

3. Mary Wacera, 37:17

4. Buze Diriba, 38:03

5. Melissa Dock, 38:04

6. Rosie Donegan, 38:07

7. Emily Durgin, 38:09

8. Erica Kemp, 38:13

9. Kim Conley, 38:16

10. Elaina Tabb, 38:18

World Under 20 Pictured

Today we share images from the World Under 20 championship in Tampere, Finland

The team Kenya arriving then to the jogs and a few running before getting to the stadium to battle it out for glory.

And now to the battle for the honours

Kenya Names World Under-20 Team

World Under-18 team graduated to the junior ranks in style by making it to the Tampere-bound side.
They include Samson Ndingiti (walk race-bronze), Mary Moraa (400m-silver) and Moitalel Mpoke (400m hurdles-silver).

Leonard Bett (2,000m steeplechase), Jackline Wambui (800m), George Manangoi (1,500m) and Caren Chebet (2,000m steeplechase) also made it alongside Edward Zakayo and Stanley Waithaka, who won silver and bronze in 3,000m and Lydia Jeruto, the World Under-18 800m silver medallist.
Also in the team in the only field event is men’s triple jump athlete Philip Musyoka.
Primary school pupils Zena Jemutai (South Rift) and Mercy Chepkorir (South Rift) claimed the two tickets.
Jemutai clocked 9:06.92 beating Chepkorir to second in 9:06.96.
Chepkirui attributed her dismal performance to lack of training, having just recovered from a hamstring injury, while Jemutai, a class seven pupil at Keringet Boarding Primary School, said good training back at home did the trick.

“The battle was tight but my joy is that I made it. I won’t just go to Tampere to add on the numbers, I am targeting a medal,” said Moraa, a Form four student at Mogonga High School.
Mpoke timed 50.87 to prevail in the men’s 400m hurdles, as James Mucheru (Nairobi) clocked 51.23 for second place to all book their tickets.
Zakayo, the Commonwealth 5,000m bronze medallist, and Waithaka, the National Cross Country Under-20 champion, strutted to a 1-2 finish in 13:19.74 and 13:23.67 in the men’s 5,000m to earn their berths.

“We have no choice but to maintain our steeplechase reign in Tampere,” said Bett.

“Winning at home shows that I’m in good shape and I will be going for nothing short of victory.”

Ndingiti, the World Under-18 10,000m race walk bronze medallist, clocked 42:03.30 to win his event and qualify, as Moraa timed 54.94 seconds to triumph, beating the qualifying standard time of 55.00 seconds.
Moraa will be the sole Kenyan in the race after second-placed Grace Nyakai (Central), who timed 56.75, failed to qualify.

“The battle was tight but my joy is that I made it. I won’t just go to Tampere to add on the numbers, I am targeting a medal,” said Moraa, a Form four student at Mogonga High School

“I happy I will be defending my title in Tampere. Since winning the title in 2016, I have gained enough experience that will enable defend my title,” said Chespol.

Rome Diamond League in Photos

Wycliffe Kinyamal has kept his winning form in the men’s 800M and now stands at 16 points followed ny Jonathan Kitilit at 13 points as Ferguson Cheruiyot came in third with 11 points.

Timothy Cheruiyot on the hand won the men’s 1500M leading to 16 points. Samuel Tefera comes second and has 13 points as Charles Cheboi Simotwo closed in third place with 9 points.

In the women’s 3000M steeplechase, the Emma Coburn deconstruction of Kenyan steeple chasing was in HD, unfortunately her fall denied us a chance to experience fireworks at the finish line. Needless to say, she has proven to be a favorite and definite competitor that Kenyan ladies must keep an eye on, especially Hyvin Kiyeng who triumphed with 8 points on the diamond league table. Following closely is Celliphine Chepsol with 7 points as Norah Jeruto closed with 6 points. Notably, the three are Kenyans.

RESULTS

1500m Men

1 CHERUIYOT Timothy KEN 15 3:31.22 WL

2 MANANGOI Elijah Motonei 3:33.79 SB

3 TEFERA Samuel 3:34.84

4 SOULEIMAN Ayanleh DJI 3:34.87 SB

5 SIMOTWO Charles Cheboi KEN 3:35.03

6 DA’VALL GRICE Charles GBR 3:35.72 SB

7 TOLOSA Taresa ETH 3:36.22

8 WOTE Aman 3:36.30

3000M Steeplechase Men

1 KIPRUTO Conseslus KEN8:08.40 WL

2 KIGEN Benjamin KEN 15 8:10.01

3 BEYO Chala ETH 13 8:11.22 PB

4 KIRUI Amos KEN 17 8:16.44

5 MEKHISSI BENABBAD Mahiedine FRA 14 8:16.97 SB

6 CHEMUTAI Albert UGA 8 8:17.17 PB

7 TINDOUFT Mohamed MAR 10 8:20.30 SB

8 KOECH John BRN 3 8:22.00 SB

3000M Steeplechase Women

1 KIYENG Hyvin KEN 9:04.96 WL MR

2 CHESPOL Celliphine Chepteek KEN 18 9:05.14 SB

3 JERUTO Norah KEN 9:07.17 SB

4 COBURN Emma USA 9:08.13 SB

5 CHEPKOECH Beatrice KEN 9:15.85

6 YAVI Winfred Mutile BRN 9:16.38 PB

7 JEPKEMEI Daisy KEN 9:18.44

8 PRAUGHT Aisha JAM 13 9:19.33

1500M Men

1 CHERUIYOT Timothy KEN 3:31.22 WL

2 MANANGOI Elijah Motonei KEN 3:33.79 SB

3 TEFERA Samuel ETH 3:34.84

4 SOULEIMAN Ayanleh DJI 3:34.87 SB

5 SIMOTWO Charles Cheboi KEN 13 3:35.03

6 DA’VALL GRICE Charles GBR 3:35.72 SB

7 TOLOSA Taresa ETH 8 3:36.22

8 WOTE Aman ETH 3:36.30

And now a collection of the amazing action from the Rome Diamond League. Enjoy

The History of Steeplechase

While most track and field events are fairly straightforward – run this distance as fast as you can; throw this object as far as you can – one event in particular stands out for its sheer weirdness. This would be the 3,000-meter steeplechase.

You may, understandably, wonder what’s going on with the steeplechase: what are these massive barriers doing on the track, and why are the runners jumping over them? Why is there a water pit? And why, really, is this silly race called the steeplechase?

Credit: Tumo Photography

Allow us to explain.

Like many track and field events, the steeplechase’s origins can be traced back to United Kingdom. Runners, as they were apparently wont to do, would often race each other from one town’s church steeple to the next. The steeples were chosen because they were easy to see from long distances, leading to the name “steeplechase.” The countryside would also require runners to jump over various barriers over the course of their race. These included stone walls and small rivers. When the race was modernized, the walls were simulated with hurdles and the rivers and creeks were simulated with the water pit.

According to the IAAF, the modern 3,000-meter steeplechase track event – with the barriers and the water pit – first originated at Oxford University in the mid-19th century. It was then included in the English Championship in 1879. In the Olympics, men have raced the steeplechase since 1920, while the women, somewhat shockingly, only first raced it at the Olympics in 2008 in Beijing.

Today, the race features five barriers: four hurdles plus the barrier before the water pit. For the men, those barriers are 36 inches, and for the women they are 30 inche


s. The water pit, meanwhile, is 12 feet long for both.

Often you’ll see runners land one foot on the top of the barrier to propel themselves over it, though many elite runners just clear the whole thing altogether. Wipeouts are all too common, especially in or around the water.

An example of what can happen if you don’t properly traverse the water pit is on the photos, swipe forward.
It’s a quirky race, to be sure, but it’s also a sneakily fun one.